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Archive for August 13th, 2016

After stealing money from the ummah, from the Chinese, then spending the loot in kafir countries, on kafir goods, and on kafir property, they spit out about the wonders of Islam and moderation and Malay maruah. Still back home, they shout ‘bangsa, agama dan negara’.

And, an ignorant and naive ummah not only believes them (even if a Malay mother must watch her daughter starve), but actually sees nothing at all in this scheme of things. Biasa la. What have these Malaiyoos wrought on this country? After decades of indoctrination, they can no more tell who are friends and who are not, what’s true and false.

Before, they (Mahathir, Ibrahim Ali, Ahi Attan, RPK, Zack Mohd and the Rahmans) would blame the Chinese for exploiting Umno’s tolerance and generosity of letting the Chinese get rich from Malays and from Malaysia. Now, Malaiyoos blame the Americans who want to kill Malaiyoos probably because white people are after some Nusantara kampung grass to golf with Najib.

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A Bugis Tribe in an Internet Era

In an Internet age, even the monks have stopped meditating, looking for the Tan Keng Liang Bugis tweet.

https://tse1.mm.bing.net/th?id=OIP.M12d7f1817ba8af73b36b71c0656a7fedo0&pid=15.1&P=0&w=289&h=174

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‘This is not the first time a revolution in information technology has resulted in a crisis of veracity.’ How to challenge the lies? Write an essay.

The trouble with the Internet? Like Najib is direct to 1MDB, and like Rahman to his fucking Twitter account, the men who could lie anyhow he likes; there’s no stopping them; there is no gatekeeper, not anyone, not even the overrated Ahi Attan in between or the uber bigot Helen Ang and the dedak eaters of Najib:

Nothing is more ephemeral than words. Moving them from the mind of a writer to the mind of a reader is one of the most elusive and difficult undertakings ever to challenge the human intelligence…. — Norman Cousins, in the Saturday Review

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Bugis High Culture

https://i2.wp.com/www.sbs.com.au/movies/sites/sbs.com.au.film/files/styles/full/public/buddenbrooks_704.jpg

No, not the differences. Those are obvious. It is the similarity. See any?

https://shuzheng.files.wordpress.com/2016/08/3bfc5-najib2bdi2bkazakhstan.png?w=491&h=357

The Decline of a Family

He had two lives: one, open, seen and known by all who cared to know, full of relative truth and of relative falsehood, exactly like the lives of his friends and acquaintances; and another life running its course in secret. And through some strange, perhaps accidental, conjunction of circumstances, everything that was essential, of interest and of value to him, everything in which he was sincere and did not deceive himself, everything that made the kernel of his life, was hidden from other people.

You’ve to forgive the deception, above. It is permitted today. The passage, in truth, is from Thomas Mann’s Buddenbrooks: The Decline of a Family (1900, translator John E Woods). So the deception is ours because it is actually so eerily familiar. We’ve seen the deception, felt it, and lived it. The future of the Najib family has been written: ‘one life open, seen; another life running secret.’

Compare the two photos above. See similar elements? A modern Bugis family who thought they have finally arrived: high culture, but the sort of life they could never truly and genuinely belong to. Yet they want those things so badly — and not just western luxury culture but French names on suits, earrings, clutch bags, bow ties, swimming pools, English country houses, horse carts and jets, silver cutlery, even Alpine air — that they would have to pay for them. But, the money? How?

What a fucked up bunch of Malaiyoos, of imitations. But they are the signs of the last days….

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